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Kgalagadi TFP

Kalahari lions tucked safely behind new electrified fencing

The future of the famous Kalahari lions has, for now, been secured, with the completion of a multimillion rand electrified fence between the border of the Kgalaghadi Transfrontier Park arid farming communities on the Namibian side.

A few years ago environmentalists were shocked when 13 lions were shot by a farmer in Namibia after they had forced their way through a corroded fence to hunt farm stock.

Park wardens managed to save two other lions.

Dries Engelbrecht, manager of Arid Parks, which include the Richtersveld National Park, Augrabies, the Kgalaghadi Transfrontier Park and the Vaalbos National Park, said since the death of the 13 lions, there had been no other major losses.

“We have a good relationship with the Namibian farmers and there is an understanding that we try to save these animals, rather than shoot them. However, recently more than R7 million was made available to strengthen and repair the fence.

“We have also installed the latest electrical fencing equipment and we believe this will stop animals crossing over to farmland.”


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